The Trachycarpus fortunei is also called a Chusan palm and Chinese windmill palm Native to central China, southern Japan and northern Burma as well as northern India Named after a Robert Fortune who smuggled them from China to England Grows to heights of 6 to 12 meters [20-40 feet]; average height around 8.5 meters or approx. 25 feet Tolerant of a wide range of light conditions Cold hardy to around minus 18 C/4 F. USDA zone 7B to 10 Looks best with weekly watering in summer. Twice weekly during heat waves Leaf type - palmate
TROPI-COLE TRADING Palm Trees and More
Located Outside
Victoria, BC
tropicoletrading@gmail.com
Victoria, BC 250-478-8996
This is a Trachycarpus fortunei, commonly referred to as a Windmill Palm Actually it’s two Windmill palms achieved by planting two seedlings or otherwise small trees together.  Some facts about the fortunei:
Chamaerops humilis, [cam-er-ops] referred to as the Mediterranean Fan Palm It has multiple trunks and this is a naturally occurring trait whereas with the Windmill palm, noted above, individual plants must be placed together to achieve this eye-catching effect. Facts about the Chamaerops humilis: Growth rate is slow to moderate Grows to 3 - 6 meters [10 - 20 ft.] wide as well as tall due to side-ward reaching trunks Cold hardy to around minus 12 C/10 F. USDA zone 8-11 Once established it is tolerant of dry and hot conditions A wonderful courtyard specimen with a sub-tropical accent Europe’s most northern growing palm Leaf type - palmate Doesn’t require full sun; tolerates part shade
You can learn more at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trachycarpus_fortunei  … for instance - did you know that the Windmill Palm was cultivated in China and Japan for thousands of years, for its coarse but very strong leaf sheath fibre, used for making rope, sacks, and other coarse cloth where great strength is important.
For Vancouver Island and SW British Columbia
The humilis in Chamaerops humilis means low, humble since it doesn’t reach 30 to 40 feet like the Windmill palm. However what it loses in height it makes up for in breadth, as each individual trunk demands its share of space and sunlight.  
The Mediterranean Fan palm has varied landscape uses and is an absolutely picturesque stand-alone specimen, widely adaptable to many climates. It should be noted however, that in the Victoria, British Columbia area situated between the 48th and 49th parallel latitude it will require protection during major Arctic outflow events. Only for a few days in some years. Usually just a cover is sufficient, but a major outflow event could require the addition of incandescent lights. And as already stated, only for a few days. The effect is so attractive, however, you may not wish to remove them. Definitely, a Chamaerops humilis is a palm to consider for your home or business. (See the Plant Care page to learn how to protect your palm).
Butia capitata, [Jelly Palm] originating in Southern Brazil
With it’s proud arching petioles and graceful feather leaves, this palm makes an outstanding landscape subject lending a tropical effect wherever it is placed.  Growth rate is slow to moderate. Reaches height of 4½ meters [15 feet]. Cold hard to -7.5 C [18F]. USDA zone 8 to 10B. Thick trunk covered with overlapping stubby leaf bases Leaf type:  pinnate and it’s foliage is a blue-green. Sometimes called a Pindo palm and a Jelly palm Flower colour yellow-orange.
It is sometimes called a Jelly palm because it produces large, showy clusters of orange-yellow, juicy, edible fruits the size of large dates which are often used to make jams or jellies. The Butia capitata is one of the most popular palms in the world due to it’s stunning appearance and is the most cold-hardy pinnate  
palm. Hard to resist. It does require protection during major Arctic outflow events, similar to what would be provided for the Mediterrean fan palm. Protect if temps are forecast to drop to -6 C/ 21 F. And again, only for a few days in some years.  (See the Plant Care page to learn how to protect this palm).
2015 - Tropi-Cole Trading
For Vancouver Island and SW British Columbia
Palm Trees and More
Located Outside
Victoria, BC
tropicoletrading@gmail.com
Victoria, BC 250-478-8996
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